Techworld

AMD's APU loves Linux, but Android? Maybe

Linux important in embedded space
  • (Techworld Australia)
  • 02 February, 2011 09:07
AMD's vice president for worldwide product marketing, Leslie Sobon. An APU C-Series tablet running Windows 7 is in the background. In future such tablets may run Android

AMD's vice president for worldwide product marketing, Leslie Sobon. An APU C-Series tablet running Windows 7 is in the background. In future such tablets may run Android

At the Sydney launch of its new Fusion APU processor technology, AMD committed to supporting Linux on its hardware, but shied away from any announcement of Android-based devices just yet.

The AMD Fusion family of Accelerated Processing Units (APUs) integrate an x86 CPU and discrete-level graphics on a single chip, making it useful for general computing and high-definition video.

In Australia for the launch event, AMD’s vice-president for worldwide product marketing, Leslie Sobon, proudly showed off a new Acer 10-inch tablet PC with a C-series processor running Windows 7.

“An APU chip is the perfect product for tablets and embedded devices,” Sobon said. “This Acer tablet with APU is the first of many and it features HDMI out.”

The new chips run Windows, but what about Linux and, in the embedded space, the Linux-based Android operating system?

“We fully support Linux, which is very important in the embedded space,” Sobon said.

As for Android, Sobon said “we’re not ready to comment on Android”.

With ARM and Intel-based tablets and phones running Android shipping like hotcakes, it’s certainly a market AMD doesn’t want to ignore.

Sobon trumpeted the benefits of its new C-series APU design, saying it gives as much processing power as supercomputers of the mid-80s while drawing 9W of power all in the size of an Australian five cent coin.

AMD country manager for Australia and New Zealand, Brian Slattery, said AMD Fusion is “changing the industry” by enabling more vivid digital experiences for consumers on a PC.

The new chips also feature AMD’s “AllDay Power” for battery life of between 8 and 11 hours on a portable computer depending on the usage profile.

The APU technology will be delivered in three series - E-Series, C-Series and A-Series.

E-Series is designed for notebooks, all-in-one PCs and small form-factor desktops, and A-Series – due out later this year will be aimed at more powerful desktops and sport 500 Giga FLOPS of processing power, according to AMD.

More about: Acer, AMD, Intel, Linux
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