New Victorian networking research org builds on IBES’s work

Melbourne Networked Society Institute will address scale and speed of connectivity in Victoria

A new think tank called the Melbourne Networked Society Institute (MNSI) has been launched to look at connectivity issues in Victoria such as scale and speed.

The organisation will comprise more than 100 researchers from the University of Melbourne and external partners from other universities, industry, government, charity and community sectors.

The MNSI was established through an ICT platform within the University of Melbourne’s Institute for a Broadband Enabled Society (IBES), which was the result of $5 million in government grants awarded in 2009.

MNSI “marks the natural evolution of the Institute as research has evolved from focusing on universal access to broadband to the complexity, scale and speed of connectivity underpinning the networked society,” according to the organisation’s director, Thas Nirmalathas.

According to Victorian minister for small business, innovation and trade, Adem Somyurek, the new think tank will also be tasked with driving new ideas and innovation.

He said the ICT sector provides significant economic growth and jobs to Victoria, with revenues of $34 billion and exports of $2.5 billion annually.

“Victoria’s ICT sector has a strong future and this new think-tank will drive new ideas and innovation, which means more opportunities and more jobs,” Somyurek said in a statement.

“Our ICT strategy will recognise the industry’s significance in supporting the Victorian economy and changing the way we do business.”

Earlier this year the state government announced $60 million plan to help startups.

Read more: Vic govt push to streamline service delivery

Follow Hamish Barwick on Twitter: @HamishBarwick

Follow Computerworld Australia on Twitter: @ComputerworldAU, or take part in the Computerworld conversation on LinkedIn: Computerworld Australia

Join the TechWorld newsletter!

Error: Please check your email address.

Tags think tankvictorian government

More about University of Melbourne

Show Comments