Bauer Media chooses Dropbox for collaboration

1300 staff using software to share designs, documents

Australian media group Bauer Media has used Dropbox for Business to share documents and designs, reducing the need for network drives, email and paper printouts.

Bauer Media director of technology Stephen Haddad said that it rolled out the offering in late 2014.

Approximately 1300 staff across Australia and New Zealand have access to Dropbox for Business.

Prior to the implementation, staff were using a variety of personal file sharing accounts including Dropbox and Google Drive.

Collaborative processes that used to require stacks of paper or CD copies now take place via shared folders.

For example, staff in the operations space are using the offering to share documents that are worked on with other people.

“Within my senior leadership team, status reports are lodged by the senior person into Dropbox. This allows me to review them from any device,” said Haddad.

In the editorial space, editors and designers use the solution to work on features before these are moved into the editorial workflow system.

Advertising staff use the offering to store sales presentations which are later accessed on a laptop or tablet when they visit clients.

Read more: Dropbox for Business adds groups with open API

Staff can also make comments within a file and tag other team members in a document.

“It’s the only solution we roll out and it forms part of our induction process for people where they are given access to a certain set of tools,” he said.

“One of the key strategies in the [Bauer Media] technology space is the enterprise grade at home experience. That means taking tools you would use at home such as Dropbox and implementing the business version.”

Haddad said that adoption has been high as staff were already familiar with Dropbox and had used it at home.

“One of the strong features is that it allows you to integrate your personal and professional account through the same profile. I’ve got both my personal and Bauer Dropbox on the same interface,” he said.

To secure files during collaboration sessions, the company uses OKTA for Active Directory integration and single sign-on.

Follow Hamish Barwick on Twitter: @HamishBarwick

Follow Computerworld Australia on Twitter: @ComputerworldAU, or take part in the Computerworld conversation on LinkedIn: Computerworld Australia

Join the TechWorld newsletter!

Error: Please check your email address.

Tags Case studiesBauer MediaDropbox for BusinessCase Study

More about DropboxGoogleTwitter

Show Comments