Tech industry employees set for a small pay bump

Sixty eight per cent of employers in the sector will be handing out salary increases

Sixty eight per cent of Australian technology companies will be rewarding their staff with a salary increase according to the latest Michael Page Australia Salary & Employment Outlook.

However, most of these pay rises will be between 1 and 5 per cent.

Thirty five per cent of the respondents, which were surveyed in May, said their employees would receive a bonus while 65 per cent of respondents said they would not be giving out bonuses.

The survey covered 179 employers in the sector.

“Salary increases are in line with previous years and we can expect modest rises across the industry. Some skill sets can demand more and it is becoming a common trend for employers to include a completion bonus for fixed-term contracts to encourage people to stay,” said Michael Page Australia director of technology Niall O’Rourke in a statement.

The most popular ways of retaining staff included financial incentives (21 per cent), strong company culture (64 per cent), recognition and rewards (46 per cent), training and mentoring partnerships (40 per cent), work/life balance initiatives (58 per cent) and global career opportunities (12 per cent). The respondents could select more than one answer.

The most popular methods used to attract staff included financial incentives (16 per cent), strong company culture (67 per cent), recognition and rewards (31 per cent), training and mentoring (28 per cent), work/life balance initiatives (58 per cent) and global career opportunities (14 per cent).

According to the report, 37 per cent of technology employers surveyed will be increasing headcount in the next 12 months. Forty per cent of employers rate overall IT industry confidence as fair and 35 per cent rate it as good.

“Overall confidence levels in the technology industry are good and we expect to see some growth in the next six to 12 months. We have seen large growth in the health and education sector in the last six months, with project managers, business analysts and programme directors highly sought after,” said O’Rourke.

Read more: IT bosses want to hire this quarter: Hudson

The job types in highest demand are: Project managers, programme managers, business analysts, PMO analysts, programme directors, infrastructure and service delivery, cloud and business intelligence.

"Industry developments spurring demand for these job types are mainly from a cloud perspective - it's a more competitive space now and many options are now more affordable than previously, so people who are Amazon Web Services specialists can demand a higher salary due to a shortage of candidates in this area," he said.

In addition, more employers are looking to hire women in project management and business analyst roles. However, women still account for less than a fifth of the 460,000 IT workforce in Australia.

Turning to C-level recruitment, some organisations are not hiring CIOs any more, according to the report. For example, if a CIO resigns, a business will recruit a head of IT to save costs.

Read more: IT workers want training from employers – to help them land new jobs: report

The report also included salary tables for New South Wales, Victoria, Queensland, Western Australia and South Australia.

In all states, the CIO or IT director of a large organisation could expect to earn over $350,000 per year.

Working at a medium-sized company, a CIO could earn between $220,000 and $350,000 in NSW, Victoria, Queensland, WA and SA.

Working at a small company, a CIO could expect to earn between $150,000 and $250,000 in NSW, Victoria, Queensland and South Australia. However, in WA a CIO could earn between $180,000 and $220,000 a year working for a small organisation.

Read more: Almost half of new ICT hires not up to the job

In all states, the IT manager of a large company could expect to earn over $140,000.

An IT manager working at a medium-sized company in any of the states could expect to earn between $130,000 and $140,000.

Meanwhile, an IT manager working for a small company in any of the states could expect to earn between $120,000 and $130,000.

Follow Hamish Barwick on Twitter: @HamishBarwick

Follow Computerworld Australia on Twitter: @ComputerworldAU, or take part in the Computerworld conversation on LinkedIn: Computerworld Australia

Join the TechWorld newsletter!

Error: Please check your email address.

Tags salary growthemploymentMichael Page International

More about Amazon Web ServicesTwitter

Show Comments
[]