Stories by Network World staff

Carnegie Mellon raises Charles Darwin from the dead

If Charles Darwin where alive today, about 200 years after he was born, he'd have a few things to say. That's the thinking behind a project from Carnegie Mellon University's Entertainment Technology Center and Duquesne University that virtually brings the British naturalist and father of evolution theory back to life.

How thin can TVs get?

Flat-panel TV as thin as just 6.5-millimeters at the International Consumer Electronics Show

Star Trek movie star Ricardo Montalban dead at 88

Ricardo Montalban, the actor who showed range playing the villainous Khan character in "Star Trek," as well as the suave host of the "Fantasy Island" TV series, has died at the age of 88 in Los Angeles. The cause of death was said to be complications from old age, according to a UPI report.

Steve Jobs' letter to Apple employees

Apple CEO Steve Jobs Wednesday announced he would be taking a leave of absence from Apple because of his health. Here is the text of the e-mail sent to all Apple employees.

Researchers applying P2P to traffic control

University of California, Irvine researchers are applying lessons learned from music and video peer-to-peer file transfer networks to a system for reducing traffic jams on the roads.

Novell axes BrainShare

Novell has alerted customers and partners that it is cancelling its annual BrainShare conference, which was to have been held in Salt Lake City in March, due to would-be attendees' restricted travel budgets.

NASA blasts iTunes with free podcasts

NASA last week announced it would pump up the volume on its latest space exploration technology by dumping a pile of free podcasts on Apple's immensely popular iTunes site.

November Cool Tools

A snapshot of the latest and greatest gadgets, gizmos and technology announced this month.

US aviation authority greenlights satellite-based air traffic control system

As one of the massive flying seasons gets underway the US government yesterday took a step further in radically changing the way aircraft are tracked and moved around. Specifically the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) gave the green light to deploy satellite tracking systems across the US, replacing the current radar-based approach.

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