Stories by Ellen Messmer

The worst security SNAFUs this year (so far!)

Security SNAFUs? How bad is it so far this year? Well, let's start with Snapchat's 4.6 million user database SNAFU, followed by a parade of retail stores including Neiman Marcus and Sally Beauty Holdings, telling their customers how their payment card information had been hacked. The hacker group Syrian Electronic Army was also busy tormenting Microsoft, among many others. And there's plenty of other mischief, such as denial-of-service attacks and cyber-espionage to round out what's only the first half of the year.

Bugcrowd adds ‘flex' pricing model to bug-bounty programs

Bugcrowd, the firm that offers a bug-bounty service program that brings together companies willing to pay to hear about serious software vulnerabilities and the security researchers that can find them, says it's offering a new pricing model.

10 security start-ups to watch

Security start-ups arise because they have fresh approaches to fighting malware and cyber-espionage or combatting the insider threat through network monitoring. In this round-up of some of the newer security firms, Distil Networks, Observable Networks and Vectra Networks fit into that category. But two others just out of the gate, Exabeam and Fortscale, are part of another trend--squeezing more out of existing log management and security information and event management products.

Gartner to IT security pros: Get ready for ‘digital business'

There's a "digital business" revolution coming and IT security professionals need to grasp the significance early on to be prepared to address whatever security needs arise. That was the message from Gartner analyst Jorge Lopez in the closing keynote at the Gartner Security and Risk Management Summit today.

Gartner: Best practices for Amazon AWS security

The Amazon AWS cloud service is fine for enterprise workloads and applying security controls such as encryption and firewalls is possible, though more security vendors need to step up to support Amazon's EC2 service, according to the Gartner analysis presented today.

Gartner: IT leaders need to find their inner ferocious pack animal

Gartner analyst Tina Nunno, author of a book called "The Wolf in CIO's Clothing," wants IT leaders to find their inner ferocious pack animal not only to be able to snarl at enemies challenging them but to better inspire team cohesion through displays of power, and yes, cunning.

Former NSA director defends data collection, cloud security

Former National Security Agency director Gen. Keith Alexander claims the media leaks by Edward Snowden about how the NSA conducts cyber-espionage have undermined national security .... and he ardently defends those NSA bulk collection practices.

Will perimeter firewalls give way to ‘RASP'?

If the firewall isn't dead it may be old and sick and not up to the job anymore, while an emerging technology called "Runtime Application Self-Protection" (RASP) could take over most of its duties.

Gartner: Top trends in IT security technology

Gartner has kicked off its annual Gartner Security and Risk Management Summit 2014 in National Harbor, Maryland, by pointing to the top threat challenges heading into next year -- and added that in the future, the term IT security will give way to "digital security" to encompass newer challenges, such as the Internet of Things.

Cisco mum on future of ThreatGrid's partnership arrangements

Having completed its acquisition of ThreatGRID this week, Cisco put forward plans for how the TreatGRID sandboxing technology will fit in the Cisco security portfolio. The company also acknowledged it's not entirely clear yet on what to do about the many technology-sharing relationships that ThreatGRID has had with other vendors, including Cisco competitor, Check Point.

Waratek tackles Java application security

Waratek is introducing its first product aimed at Java application security, and it works by identifying weaknesses, especially in open-source platforms, and then acts like a shield against attacks.

Palo Alto Networks report fingers UDP as major malware helper

Palo Alto Networks' annual threat analysis of customer network traffic shows that botnet-controlled malware that makes its way into enterprise networks almost always uses the User Datagram Protocol (UDP) to communicate, blending in with legitimate UDP-based applications such as video.

Market Place

[]