Stories by Joel Snyder

Review: Dell WYSE delivers Android-on-a-stick

Thin clients aren't very exciting, and for a reason: they're designed to allow remote access to servers, usually with a Citrix, Microsoft, or VMware client. The folks at Dell WYSE have spiced up the category by building a thin client on top of Android, and getting it down to a form factor only slightly larger than a USB memory stick.

Oh, Bi the Way...

Hidden in Cisco's Nexus 9000 and Application Centric Infrastructure news was another nifty announcement: an optical transceiver that delivers 40Gbps speeds using older 10Gbps fiber and standard connectors. Cisco's "BiDi" optical transceivers solve a sticky cabling problem in an elegant way.

FIRST LOOK: Cisco Nexus 9000

The Cisco Nexus 9000 series, the fruit of Cisco's Insieme spin-in, is more than another fast router -- it's a change in the way that high-end routers are designed and built.

First Look: Cisco ACI re-imagines the enterprise data center network

Cisco's Application Centric Infrastructure (ACI) is a revolutionary re-thinking of how to provision and manage data center networks. While the early version we looked at has some rough edges, and Cisco still has some hard problems to solve, ACI has the potential to completely change the way that large, highly virtualized data center networks are configured and built.

I wrote the Macworld Networking Bible and it was good

My first Mac was a Mac 512K from the early 1980s, probably 1985. It replaced my Heathkit CP/M system, and when I went on business trips, that thing -- and an external hard drive, what a luxury -- traveled with me all over the country in a huge padded case.

Riverbed wins 7-vendor WAN optimization test

As applications move to the cloud, network managers are seeing increasing requirements to optimize and manage WAN connections. Most enterprises have migrated to web-based applications and make heavy use of Internet services for day-to-day business. All of this makes network performance a key factor for productivity and end-user satisfaction.

Cisco impresses with first crack at next-gen firewall

When we tested next-generation firewalls last May, at least one important security vendor wasn't there: Cisco, because they weren't ready to be tested. Now that the ASA CX next-generation firewall has had a year to mature, we put the product through its paces, using the same methodology as our last NGFW test.

Review: HP's new thin client raises the bar

Thin clients can't be cracked or hacked; they don't have fans or disks to fail; they don't need to be patched nearly as often as Windows; they don't draw much power; and they don't cost a whole lot of money to buy or maintain.

Next-gen firewalls require external visibility tools

Knowing what's happening on your network is a pre-requisite to controlling the traffic. We call that visibility because it combines all of the information the firewall knows, including session and application information, traffic volumes, and rate information, into a way to "see" into your network -- to give you visibility.

Palo Alto next-gen firewall stacks up well

Palo Alto Networks has bet everything on being a next-generation firewall. Without the next-generation hook, Palo Alto has little chance at breaking into the established world of firewalls, and they've done a good job at defining the category on their own terms.

How we tested next-generation firewalls

We tested next generation firewalls by looking at seven separate areas that we felt would be important to network managers trying to deploy these products in enterprise networks.

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