Stories by Ann Bednarz

Tech's highest-paid CEOs, biggest raises and smallest salaries

Before the new year rolls in, we're recapping the tech industry's top earners, biggest CEO bonuses, fattest raises, <a href="http://www.networkworld.com/slideshows/2011/030911-ceo-perks.html">priciest perks</a> and smallest salary earners, calculated from our analysis of 36 tech companies' 2011 proxy statements.

Shoppers with iPads spend more

If an online shopper is using an iPad to browse retail sites, that shopper is likely to make more purchases and spend more money than someone using an Android device or a PC to shop online.

IT pros staying put, expecting raises

There's cause for contentment among IT pros, many of whom are staying put at their current jobs due to a combination of lingering economic concerns and improving conditions at work.

Allow social media vs. ban social media at work

The pull of social media is proving hard to resist. Even some of the most buttoned-down institutions are <a href="http://www.networkworld.com/community/tech-debate-block-social-networks">rethinking bans</a> and relaxing access to social networks and social media sites.

Browser wars: IE vs. Firefox vs. Chrome vs. Safari vs. Opera

All eyes are on <a href="http://www.networkworld.com/news/2010/050410-5-reasons-why-google-chrome.html">Google's Chrome</a> browser as it battles Mozilla's Firefox in a tight fight for the No. 2 position behind Microsoft's Internet Explorer, which is holding onto its market-leading share of the desktop browser market.

What to expect from IBM's on-deck CEO: Continuity, stability, charisma

Virginia "Ginni" Rometty is set to succeed <a href="http://www.networkworld.com/news/2011/030811-ibm-palmisano-compensation.html">Sam Palmisano</a> as CEO of IBM in January, and industry watchers expect a smooth, drama-free transition as the 30-year IBM veteran takes the reins. Rometty, 54, has played a critical role in shaping IBM strategy, and she's expected to stay the course she helped define.

5 tech pros companies want to hire

Seasoned networking pros are in an enviable position, according to Robert Half Technology. The tech staffing firm includes systems and networking engineers among the top five tech professionals that companies are currently looking to hire.

Cisco CEO's pay falls 32 per cent

CEO John Chambers received compensation valued at $12.9 million in Cisco's 2011 fiscal year, a period when the company restructured operations, shuttered its Flip video cam business and eliminated more than 12,000 jobs. His total pay package is down 32% compared to 2010, when Chambers received $18.9 million, according to documents filed this week with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission.

7 'MBA preferred' IT jobs

Among the 84,000 open tech positions currently listed on Dice.com, there are roughly 1,400 job listings that say a master's of business administration is preferred, and they come from a variety of industries, says Tom Silver, senior vice president, North America, at the tech jobs site.

Should tech pros get an MBA?

Michael Morris had a decade of networking and communications experience (including four years as a paratrooper in the U.S. Army) under his belt when he decided to go back to school to earn a Master's of Business Administration degree, or MBA. An IT manager at a $5 billion tech company, Morris leads a team of engineers responsible for data networks, storage area networks, IP telephony and <a href="http://www.networkworld.com/topics/security.html">security</a>. His certifications include <a href="http://www.networkworld.com/subnets/cisco/">Cisco</a> Certified Internetwork Expert (CCIE) and Cisco Certified Design Expert (CCDE).

Microsoft .Net skills in demand, job site reports

Many IT pros in the past have shied away from specializing in .Net application development, out of fear of choosing too narrow a specialty and limiting future job opportunities. Now that it's clear the Microsoft development platform is sticking around, there's a shortage of .Net talent in every area of the U.S., according to Dice.com.

CEO Steve Ballmer 'underpaid,' Microsoft says

Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer received compensation valued at $1.38 million this year, according to documents filed this week with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission. His total package is up roughly 2% compared to 2010, when he received compensation valued at $1.35 million.

[]