IT careers - News, Features, and Slideshows

News

  • Woman recruited by Google four times and rejected, joins suit

    There was something about Cheryl Fillekes that Google really liked. Over a seven-year period, Fillekes was contacted by Google recruiters four different times for jobs. In each case, she did well enough in the phone interviews to get an invitation for an in-person interview.

  • IBM defends use of temp visa workers

    IBM says the growth in technologies such as cloud, analytics, mobile and security is "exacerbating the skills shortage" in the tech industry, and underscores the need for temporary foreign tech workers.

  • H-1B employees crowd out other workers, says study

    The battle over the H-1B visa is mostly a battle of brute political muscle on Capitol Hill, coupled with campaign spending. But in the quieter academic sphere, the visa is a topic of ongoing research, and a new paper by three economists is challenging some of the <a href="http://www.computerworld.com/article/2899350/the-h-1b-visa-debate-pain-and-the-politics.html">assertions made by the tech industry</a> that H-1B workers deliver economic gains.

  • All hail the next big job, the chief IoT officer

    In the near future, you may hear about the appointment of a Chief Internet of Things (IoT) Officer. Before you roll your eyes and chortle at the thought of another chief-of-something, consider the problem.

  • Median age at Google is 29, says US age discrimination lawsuit

    The typical employee at Google is relatively young, according to a lawsuit brought by an older programmer who is alleging <a href="http://www.computerworld.com/article/2510342/it-industry/age-bias-in-it--the-reality-behind-the-rumors.html">age discrimination</a>.

  • Feds want to add 75K new solar power workers

    The U.S. government <a href="https://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2015/04/03/fact-sheet-administration-announces-actions-drive-growth-solar-energy-an">has announced</a> plans to help train 75,000 people to enter the solar workforce by 2020, including a number of veterans.

  • 5 minutes a week to advance your career

    The New Year is always a good time to reflect on your career: where you've been, where you're heading, and where you'd like to go. It's also the traditional time for people like me -- industry analysts, pundits and consultants -- to tell you what hot skills you'll need to develop to advance your career in the next year. Of course, if developing your career were really that simple, every reader would be the CEO of a company by now.

  • How automation could take your skills -- and your job

    Nicholas Carr's essay <em>IT Doesn't Matter</em> in the Harvard Business Review in 2003, and the later book, argued that IT is shifting to a service delivery model comparable to electric utilities. It produced <a href="http://www.computerworld.com/article/2571616/it-management/it-does-so-matter-.html">debate and defensiveness</a> among IT managers over the possibility that they were sliding to irrelevancy. It's a debate that has yet to be settled. But what <em>is</em> clear is that Carr has a talent for raising timely questions, and he has done so again in his latest work <em>The Glass Cage, Automation and Us</em> (W.W. Norton &amp; Co.)

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