NoSQL - News, Features, and Slideshows

News

  • N1QL: A SQL twist comes to document databases

    Looking to bolster query capabilities for its NoSQL database, Couchbase this week is trumpeting the arrival of its N1QL "next-generation" declarative query language, which brings SQL-like querying to Couchbase Server, the company's distributed, JSON document datastore.

  • 7 cutting-edge programming experiments worth trying

    The words "cutting edge" may be crisp and definite, slicing through air like a knife in a bar fight. But few things strike fear in the minds of enterprise IT like the claim that a new product is built by a team working on the "cutting edge" of technology.

  • Building a big data ready organization

    As we continue to see the rise of “big data”, organisations are faced with a task that they may not have anticipated and may not be prepared for. The amount of data stored by the average non-tech company (banks, insurance firms, hospitals, etc.) years ago was at manageable levels.

  • A vendor-independent comparison of NoSQL databases: Cassandra, HBase, MongoDB, Riak

    In 2010, when the world became enchanted by the capabilities of cloud systems and new databases designed to serve them, a group of researchers from Yahoo decided to look into NoSQL. They developed the YCSB framework to assess the performance of new tools and find the best cases for their use. The results were published in the paper, "Benchmarking Cloud Serving Systems with YCSB."

  • First look: Oracle NoSQL Database

    For the last few years, the world of NoSQL databases has been filled with exciting new projects, ambitious claims, and plenty of chest beating. The hypesters said the new NoSQL software packages offered tremendous performance gains by tossing away all of the structure and paranoid triple-checking that database creators had lovingly added over the years. Reliability? It's overrated, said the new programmers who didn't run serious business applications for Wall Street banks but trafficked in trivial, forgettable data about people's lives. Tabular structure? It's too hidebound and limiting. If we ignore these things, our databases will be free and insanely fast.

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