routers - News, Features, and Slideshows

News

  • How to lock down your wireless network

    If you operate a wireless network for your home or business, it's important to ward it against opportunistic hackers seeking to steal your data or hijack your Wi-Fi for their own nefarious purposes. We spoke to Steven Andrés, CTO of security consulting firm Special Ops Security, to learn about the best ways to lock down your Wi-Fi. To get started, you'll need to log in to your router's administrative console by typing the router's IP address into your Web browser's address bar. Most routers use a common address like 192.168.1.1, though alternatives like 192.168.0.1 and 192.168.2.1 are also common. Check the manual that came with your router to determine the correct IP address; if you've lost your manual, you can usually find the appropriate IP address on the manufacturer's website.

  • Juniper adds OpenFlow to its routers, switches

    Juniper Networks this week said it is making the source code of its OpenFlow application accessible to developers of applications for its Junos networking operating system software.

  • Cisco aims for a go-anywhere router

    Cisco Systems made its fortune selling routers for the cores of enterprise and service-provider networks, but now the company is sending its technology farther from those cozy confines than ever before.

  • How we tested Cloud management services

    Abiquo: We installed their virtual appliance from ISO in two VMs on an ESXi server. On the first VM, we selected the Abiquo <a href="http://www.networkworld.com/topics/server.html">Server</a>, Abiquo Remote Services, and Abiquo V2V Conversion Services for installation.

  • IETF mulls IPv6 for home networking

    The Internet Engineering Task Force is considering establishing a working group to smooth some of the impending issues around setting up and maintaining IPv6-based Internet connections into homes.

  • Alcatel leaps ahead with 400-gigabit routing chip

    Alcatel-Lucent is charting a course to the next generation of carrier routers with new silicon that is focused today on delivering services from the edge of a network but could also power a massive packet engine for the core.

  • Juniper rolls out latest Cisco challenge

    Juniper Networks this week is rolling out its first dedicated line of enterprise edge routers, a collection of products that borrow technology from the company's powerful service provider routers and that will give customers a new alternative to Cisco ASR gear.

  • Cisco urged to fold more than Flip

    Flip shouldn't be Cisco's only fold in the <a href="http://www.networkworld.com/news/2011/041211-cisco-shutter-flip.html?hpg1=bn">challenging consumer market</a>, industry watchers say.

  • Juniper merges network core elements to cut carrier costs

    Juniper Networks is developing a massive switch that could replace traditional IP (Internet Protocol) routers in the core of service-provider networks and combine optical and electronic technologies that today exist in separate systems with dedicated staffs.

  • How to reduce WAN costs

    There are basically two ways to cut WAN costs: reduce the amount of bandwidth used or find somebody who sells cheaper bandwidth.

  • Virgin Mobile MiFi 2200

    For travelers who juggle a number of connected devices while on the road, Novatel’s MiFi 2200 mobile hotspot may be a little gift from tech heaven. The device connects to Sprint’s 3G EvDO network, then creates a mobile bubble of Wi-Fi that can connect up to five devices at the same time. And best of all, you can get the device with a pre-paid, no-contract data plan from Virgin Mobile.

[]