social networks

social networks - News, Features, and Slideshows

Features

  • How to prepare your business for Google+

    Google+ just opened its doors to the world by enabling open signups and moving to the beta, testing phase. The nascent social network is still thin on features and ways for businesses to properly use it, but its minimalist approach has gained Google+ millions of users in a very short period.

  • Curtains for MySpace?

    Things just keep getting worse for MySpace. The former social networking hub recently announced it would cut nearly half of its global workforce as part of a restructuring effort.   As many as five hundred MySpace employees worldwide will soon be looking for work as the site continues to redefine itself from a social network to an entertainment content site with social networking features.

  • Who’s using Twitter? Some surprising answers

    Eight percent of online Americans may use Twitter, as the Pew Internet & American Life Project reported on Thursday. But does that mean your small business should use the service in its marketing and communications efforts?

  • Could Wikileaks scandal lead to new virtual currency?

    It's not an exaggeration to say that the recent Wikileaks scandal has shaken the Internet to its core. Regardless of where you stand on the debate, various services have simply refused to handle Wikileaks' business -- everything from domain-name providers to payment services -- and this has led to many questioning how robust the Internet actually is.

  • What's in the Tech Crystal Ball For 2011?

    Market research firm IDC makes a number of tech-related predictions near the end of every calendar year, but its prognostications for 2011 may well be among the company's most dramatic yet.

  • Diaspora could open new social scene for business

    The code was released to the public for a new social network designed to deliver the benefits of Facebook without the privacy concerns. The project--called Diaspora--also has potential as a tool for businesses to create their own social networks, but its value depends on how businesses intend to use social networking.

  • Has Digg dug its own grave?

    Some people just don't like change. Less than a week after Digg released version 4 of its social news-sharing site, fans have rebelled, flooding Digg with links from a rival sharing site, staging a "Quit Digg Day," and prophesying a major drop-off in traffic if the site doesn't return to its roots. Has Digg dug its grave, or is this yet another kneejerk neophobic reaction?

  • Facebook places will crush foursquare

    One of the odd aspects of the Facebook event launching the new Facebook Places service was the participation, support, and partnership of competing location-based check-in services.

  • Google Wave flops: What Google service will go next?

    Let's pause for a moment of silence to remember Google Wave, a service that has gone off to greener pastures. Google confirmed the news late yesterday, saying the service hadn't seen the type of user adoption it had been hoping for.

  • Goodbye Kin, Sidekick and 'social phones'

    If there's any correlation between the recently killed Kin and discontinued T-Mobile Sidekick -- aside from Microsoft having a hand in both discontinued phones -- it's that they tried to distinguish themselves from both high-powered smartphones and simpler feature phones.

  • Slideshow: Open source at Facebook

    It’s loved by millions and has risen from a small-time university social networking service to the biggest phenomenon on the Internet. It’s the phenomenon that is Facebook. Popularity, however, doesn’t come easy. With some 400 million unique home pages Facebook is pushing the boundaries of traditional Web application scalability and it’s not shy to admit that it has been achieved by leveraging open source software. We take a look at some of the slides presented by Facebook at this year's FOSDEM conference in Belgium.

  • Is there a replacement for Facebook?

    Facebook claims to have more than 400 million active users. In fact, according to Web analytics firm Alexa, only Google is a more popular site. So, with all that going for it, why are so many users unhappy, with one poll showing that more than half of Facebook users are thinking about leaving?

  • Is Facebook truly sorry for its privacy sins?

    Want an expert lesson in how to respond without actually responding and how to apologize without saying you're sorry? Then you need to read Facebook CEO Mark Zukerberg's quasi-mea culpa in today's Washington Post. Do it now; I'll wait.

  • Good-bye to privacy?

    New Yorker Barry Hoggard draws a line in the sand when it comes to online privacy. In May he said farewell to 1251 Facebook friends by deleting his account of four years to protest what he calls the social network's eroding privacy policies.

[]